Hashimoto’s and Dietary Changes

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Hashimoto’s and Dietary Changes

This blog seems to be turning into a journal of my health journey. My goal has always been to document it for my own personal reasons, but also to put it out there for anybody else who may be chronic Googlers (see #2) like myself.  So, if you are one of those; keep reading…

Hashimoto's and Dietary Changes

So You’ve Got Hashimoto’s Disease

I was recently diagnosed with severe hypothyroidism/Hashimoto’s disease. I had a feeling for many years that I had something wrong with my thyroid, but for whatever reason didn’t get the testing done to verify it.

A few weeks ago that changed when I requested lab work from my doctor. My TSH levels were 38 times the normal level.

I was immediately put on a starter dose of synthetic thyroid hormones. I was amazed at how quickly they began to work and how much more energy I had. I actually felt rested after sleeping for a decent amount of time and wasn’t requiring 10+ hours of sleep each night and still feeling exhausted. My need for a nap everyday decreased too.

Thyroid Medication for Hashimoto's Levothyroxine
Levothyroxine – Thyroid Medication

And then my body adjusted to the medication. I began having a hard time sleeping at night and felt fatigued during the day. My symptoms seemed to have returned as if nothing was ever done in the first place.

And that’s where I am now. I’m pretty sure the dosage will need to be increased, but I haven’t had my labs drawn yet to check the levels.

Researching Alternative Treatments

In the meantime, I started researching the medication and treatment. Call me naive, but I was slightly surprised to find that most people who are put on medication are on it for their entire life.

Y’all, that’s a long time!

I don’t want to rely on medication my entire life so I have been researching alternative treatments. While there is no cure that I have found, I have come across many articles where people were able to get their Hashimoto’s in remission by making lifestyle and dietary changes.

This book, Hashimoto’s Protocol in particular helped me. It has an incredible amount of information to get you started on your own journey.

Lifestyle & Dietary Changes

My lifestyle isn’t the healthiest and I’ve known for a long time I needed to make some changes, but I’ve always felt overwhelmed when trying to make those changes and ultimately giving up.

So, here I am. Changing everything, starting with my diet. Saying “Goodbye!” to some of my favorite foods.

This is the first step into trying to treat this disease without medication.

For the record, I will continue taking the medication, until I have completed all of the steps needed in order to start weaning off to test my levels off of the medication. 

Going Gluten Free

I’ve realized that in order to make it manageable and something I can stick with without getting overwhelmed, I need to take it slowly and begin with just 1 meal everyday. While there is a whole list of trigger foods, I am beginning with just one: gluten. I know I won’t see immediate results with this method, but it will help me get used to the new dietary changes over a period of time.

I am beginning with gluten as that is the biggest trigger for Hashimoto’s. For 1 week I will only eat breakfast foods that do not contain gluten. I typically just eat fruit for breakfast, but will sometimes have foods containing gluten like biscuits, peanut butter and jelly sandwich, toast, or cereal.

Slices of Bread
Dear Bread, I’m going to miss you…

After a week, I will begin eliminating gluten from snacks and other meals. I figure as time goes on, it will get easier.

Since this is my beginning, I’d love any “been there, done that” advice. What are some of your favorite gluten free breakfast foods?